Payday loans

Concern over Mordaunt’s ‘troubling’ appointment as disability minister

From Disability News Service

Disabled activists say they are “deeply concerned” by the “troubling” decision to appoint an outspoken supporter of legalising assisted suicide as the new minister for disabled people.

Penny Mordaunt was appointed minister for disabled people, health and work, in the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) this week after the sacking of Justin Tomlinson.

In an expanded brief – and at the level of minister of state, rather than junior minister – she will have responsibility for a string of divisive policy areas, including employment and support allowance (ESA), the government’s Disability Confident employment campaign, and personal independence payment, as well as for cross-government disability issues.

But Mordaunt (pictured) is a long-term advocate for changing the law to allow assisted suicide, an issue that will cause deep concern among large parts of the disabled people’s movement.

In 2010 she was appointed to the Commission on Assisted Dying, which was criticised for its bias after it was set up by the pro-assisted suicide charity Dignity in Dying with money from author Terry Pratchett and River island founder Bernard Lewis, both supporters of legalisation, and chaired by the Labour peer Lord Falconer, also a supporter of legalisation.

Mordaunt, a former director of the charity Diabetes UK, made it clear on her appointment to the commission that she was in favour of changing the law to allow assisted suicide, telling her local newspaper in Portsmouth: “My personal view is that assisted dying should be allowed for the terminally-ill.”

More here

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

Seeking Young Disabled People For Dissertation Resarch

GMCDP has been asked to circulate this informaiton

My name is Kat Henshaw, I am a post-graduate student currently studying for an MSc Marketing (communications). I am currently seeking participants for a personal research project, anyone with a physical disability would be eligible to take part. The process would involve a one-to-one interview with myself at a time and place to suit you or over Skype. The interview should take no longer than 30 minutes.

As part of my degree I am undertaking a research project centred on the representation of Disability in Advertising; as i identify as a disabled person myself, this topic is close to my heart. More specifically I am investigating why, despite the improvements that have been made in social policy for those with disabilities as a result of the social model of disability, have these practices failed to infiltrate the media and advertising industry. For the most part, these industries continue to champion the medical model of disability, focusing on impairment and characterising disability as a personal tragedy or something to be avoided.

Examples of topics discussed throughout the interview are shown below:

What does disability mean in the 21st Century?

What are the consequences of the current representation of Disability throughout advertising?

How has the increased use of Social Media effected this?

What can companies do to improve the current situation?

I am looking to collect data over the next two weeks, if you would like to take part please contact me either by phone or e-mail.
Phone: 07969870727
E-mail: katherine_henshaw6@hotmail.com

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

Pubs that do not make themselves accessible for disabled people could face closure say The House of Lords. According to a new reportargues that local authorities should refuse to renew or grant licenses for pubs who, for example, use their accessible toilets as storage, who could be running the risk of legal action under the Equality Act 2010

More here

 

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

Government’s response to Equality Act report is ‘disgusting travesty’

From Disability News Service

The government’s response to a major House of Lords inquiry into the impact of the Equality Act on disabled people – in which it appears to have accepted just eight of 55 recommendations – has been branded a “wasted opportunity”.

The crossbench disabled peer Baroness [Jane] Campbell (pictured), who was a member of the committee that carried out the nine-month inquiry, said she was “bitterly disappointed and angry” with the government’s response.

Disabled campaigner Doug Paulley, who gave evidence to the committee, described the government’s response as a “disgusting, disingenuous travesty” which “offers absolutely nothing whatsoever and treats our experiences and evidence with complete contempt”.

The committee’s report concluded, when it was published in March, that the government was failing to protect disabled people from discrimination, and that laws designed to address disability discrimination across areas including access to public buildings, housing, public spaces and public transport were “not working in practice”.

It also said that government spending cuts were having “a hugely adverse effect on disabled people”.

More here

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

GMCDP wants to know what you think of us!

Could you please complete this survey for us. Its importnat to us to know what your views are on GMCDP’s work – and what we could be doing.

If you are a disabled person – we can offer you a free year’s membership at GMCDP. Please email us at info@gmcdp.com after you complete it

Link below

Thank you

Disability Stockport Diversity Day – Tuesday 2nd August

Disability Stockport are holding their annual Diversity Day in Stockport on Tuesday 2nd August. The event is held in Mersey Square (opposite the bus station) and runs from 10.30am-4pm. There will be stalls with information from different service providers. There will also be an open day at Disability Stockport (23 High Street, Stockport) with stalls, food and drink and handmade cards & crafts

Want to know more?

Tel: 0161 480 7248

or email: email@disabilitystockport.org.uk

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

 


 

Shadow chancellor backs calls to prosecute Iain Duncan Smith over WCA deaths

From Disability News Service

Labour’s shadow chancellor has called for Iain Duncan Smith to face criminal charges over allegations that his failure to address a coroner’s concerns about the “fitness for work” test led to the deaths of disabled benefit claimants.

John McDonnell (pictured) made the call during a speech to the TUC Disabled Workers Conference in London on Friday (19 May), and his backing was reportedly greeted with enthusiasm by the audience of disabled trade unionists.

The Scottish-based grassroots group Black Triangle, backed by many other disabled activists, has led calls for the former work and pensions secretary to face a criminal investigation for misconduct in public office following his apparent refusal in 2010 to address a coroner’s concerns about the safety of the discredited work capability assessment (WCA).

They want to hold Duncan Smith and his former employment minister Chris Grayling to account in court for their failure to improve the safety of the WCA, even though they were warned that it risked causing further deaths.

More here

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

 

PIP reassessments mean 35,000 will lose Motability vehicles in 2016

From Disability News Service

Disabled people are being forced to hand back their Motability vehicles at a rate of up to 700 a week because of the government’s austerity cuts and reforms to disability benefits, according to the organisation’s own figures.

Motability expects 35,000 vehicles to be handed back by disabled people during 2016 as a result of the government’s programme to reassess people for its new disability living costs benefit, personal independence payment (PIP).

And fewer than five per cent of those customers who will have to return their vehicles to Motability this year are likely to be able to re-join the scheme after they have gone through Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) and independent appeal processes, Motability believes.

The figures show that, of Motability customers reassessed for PIP so far, 44 per cent of them have lost their entitlement to the scheme and have had to hand their vehicle back.

More here

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

Lord Mayor of Manchester presents Manchester Community History Award to Young Disabled People’s Project

Josh recieves prize

 

GMCDP’s Josh Coy accepted the Manchester Community History award from Lord Mayor Carl Austin-Behan yesterday alongside Lorna Young from the Disabled Staff Group. Members of the Young Disabled People Taking Action project had developed The Accessibles comic which won this years Manchester Community History award. Councillor Tracey Rawlings gave a speech to the chamber describing the work that young disabled people from GMCDP had done to create The Accessibles.

BBC’s Gardner ‘wants normalisation’ for disabled people’

The BBC’s disabled security correspondent has spoken of his wish for a “normalisation of disability” in society.

Frank Gardner, who was giving the third annual Jack Ashley Memorial Lecture, said he would like to see “the sharp edges of difference” between disabled and non-disabled people “sand-papered down so people don’t make a big deal about it anymore”.

He said: “What I would like to see is the normalisation of disability, that people don’t look twice at somebody who’s blind or in a wheelchair… so they are 100 per cent part of mainstream society.”

Gardner (pictured when he featured on the BBC’s Who Do You Think You Are?) told the invited audience in the state rooms used by the speaker of the House of Commons, John Bercow, about many of the daily experiences of discrimination that have frustrated him since he became disabled 12 years ago.

He described his continuing frustration with the barriers he encounters with air travel, including the ground staff who often grab him by the shoulders without asking in order to “manoeuvre” him off a plane, and how he is frequently left alone waiting for assistance at the end of a flight, long after the other passengers have disembarked.

Gardner said that many of the problems he faced were due to the “attitude” of service-providers, and that there were “a lot of areas where life could be made easier without too much difficulty”.

He also spoke of his frustration at non-disabled people who use accessible toilets, and the abuse of accessible parking bays in central London by non-disabled drivers.

He said: “For me there might as well not be a single disabled parking spot in central London because I can never find them.

“They are used by people who are able-bodied… it’s bloody annoying.”

Gardner spoke also of how he became disabled, having been shot six times and left for dead by terrorists in Saudi Arabia in 2004, and how he then spent seven months in hospital and underwent 14 operations.

He said that two things particularly helped him avoid falling into a “vortex of self-pity and despair”: the advice of a Navy psychiatrist, who told him to worry about the things he could still do and not those he would not be able to do anymore, and a letter from his bosses at BBC News which promised that his position as security correspondent would still be his when he was ready to return to work.

The lecture was hosted by Disability Rights UK (DR UK), the all-party parliamentary disability group (APPDG) and the family of the late Lord [Jack] Ashley, the former deaf MP and peer who died four years ago after nearly half a century spent fighting in parliament for disability rights and equality, and who chaired the APPDG for more than 40 years.

More here

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

Manchester Manchester University seeks help with research on the Working Well programme

Manchester Metropolitan University is conducting research on Greater Manchester’s Working Well programme (see http://www.manchester.gov.uk/news/article/6854/new_scheme_will_get_5000_working_well_in_greater_manchester).
 
This programme provides health and wellbeing support as well as helping people get into work.
 
If you have taken part in the Working Well programme, Gavin Bailey at MMU would like to do a short interview with you. Contact 0161 247 3465 (leave a message) or g.bailey@mmu.ac.uk.
 
Participation will remain confidential: your name will not be recorded, and information will not be disclosed except as anonymised quotes.
 
(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

DPAC Manchester: National Day Of Action Against Sham PIP Assessments – Wednesday 13th July

From DPAC

Atos, Maximus and Capita are literally making a killing from conducting sham assessments which are seeing thousands of legitimate claimants having their benefits refused, their incomes slashed and their motability cars removed. Whilst the success rate at tribunal is high, it is taking up to 6 months or longer for cases to be heard – leaving disabled people struggling unecessarily. Medical ‘professionals’ usually trained at public expense are deserting the NHS in order to conduct these murderous sham assessments in return for higher rates of pay. We say that all assessments should be carried out by the treatment teams in the community, and that rather than pouring taxpayer money into the poverty pimp industry, the state should be properly funding the NHS and benefits should meet the needs of all that are eligible. It is time to step up the struggle and to demand that the corporate assessors #DoNoHarm.This day of action has been called jointly by MHRN, Disabled People Against Cuts (DPAC) and WinVisible – women with visible & invisible disabilities

Where?:

PIP Consultation Centre Units 1 & 2 The Brewery Yard Deva City Office Park Trinity Way Manchester M3 7BB (for Sat Nav M3 7BD)

When?:

Wednesday 13th July (12:00 – 15:00)

Facebook event here

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

 

‘Single theme’ decision of government’s Action Alliance ‘feels like a cop-out’

From Disability News Service

A disabled-led network set up by the minister for disabled people in 2012 to offer the government advice on the implementation of its disability policies has cut the areas it focuses on to just one “strategic theme”.

Esther McVey, then the minister for disabled people, promised when it was launched that the Disability Action Alliance (DAA) would “put disabled people at the heart of creating inclusive local communities and changing attitudes to disability”.

The precise role of the alliance was never laid out by McVey but it appeared originally to be aimed at advising the government on implementation of policy at local level, rather than advising on developing policy.

It was tasked with creating partnerships between disabled people’s organisations (DPOs), government departments and other public, private and third society organisations.

But DAA is no longer a government-led initiative, although it is still government-sponsored and has a representative of its Office for Disability Issues (ODI) on the steering group, and it has now announced that it will be focusing on just one strategic theme: disabled people’s leadership in public life, including volunteering and public appointments.

More here

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

Labour left without shadow minister for Disabled People after MP revolt

Labour are currently without a Shadow Minister for Disabled People after a mass resignation has meant that previous minister Debbie Abrahams has been moved to the role of Minister for Department of Work & Pensions.

Caroline Richardson, a Labour party member and a disabled campaigner with the Spartacus online network, said she believed the promotion of Abrahams would be good for disabled people.

She said: “Whilst I recognise the current situation within the Labour parliamentary party has resulted in some ministerial posts not currently being filled, I am confident that the promotion of Debbie Abrahams to the post of shadow secretary of state for work and pensions is exceptionally beneficial to disabled people.

“Debbie brings with her to the post the knowledge base of her previous post, including the people who worked with her in that specialism.”

She said that the disabled people who had built up contacts with Abrahams would continue to provide the evidence she needed to respond to the government’s planned green paper on employment support for disabled people.

More here

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

Brexit vote: Disabled people seek safe haven in Scotland

From Disability News Service

Hundreds or even thousands of disabled people are so alarmed by the idea of Britain leaving the European Union (EU) that they are considering moving to Scotland, information from disabled activists suggests.

One disabled campaigner has told Disability News Service (DNS) that she has been contacted personally by 70 disabled people who want to leave for Scotland in the wake of last week’s referendum result, in which Britain voted to leave the EU by a margin of 52 per cent to 48 per cent.

Pat Onions (pictured), co-founder of Pat’s Petition, who lives in Scotland, said disabled people had been in touch by text, phone, email and on Facebook.

She said: “Scotland wants to remain in the EU. They felt their human rights would be protected. They felt it was a safer country to live then England.

“They felt Tories would remain in power after Brexit even with a general election in the autumn [and that]no-one in England cares about people with disabilities anymore.”

She added: “Feelings amongst disabled people are running high. They are scared – more than before with such uncertainty. Scotland seems like a safe place to be.”

More here

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

Calling all comic creators!

Pictures of pages from The Accessibles

Are you 15 – 25 Years Old? Are you a Disabled Person?

Do you live in Manchester?

From 20 July, Greater Manchester Coalition of Disabled People is running a summer project to create a comic, working with artist Jim Medway.

The comic will be a story around hate crime. Looking at what hate crime is, and how we can tell people it’s wrong to be abusive and hostile to disabled people.

Last year we created our first comic – ‘The Accessibles’ – here’s what a couple of people said about being involved:

“The team spirit has been great, good how the comic book story has reflected our own personalities and ideas… I have learnt so much.”

“The workshops made us debate, reflect and consider things from different perspectives.”

If you are interested in finding out more, contact Linda by:

Phone 0161 636 7535

Email lmarsh@gmcdp.com

Mobile for texts 07508 537561

‘Alarming’ court decision on traffic lights ‘puts blind shoppers at risk’

From Disability News Service

A Paralympic goalball star has lost his legal case against a council that switched off the traffic lights in a busy shopping area – in order to create a “shared space” street design – leaving him and other blind and visually-impaired people unable to cross the road.

Simon Goodall, who represented ParalympicsGB at London 2012, argued that the decision by Reading council to turn off the lights in January 2015 had placed him and other disabled people at risk.

He had appealed to the high court this week against its refusal to order a judicial review of the council’s decision, but his appeal was rejected.

The courtroom had been packed with guide dog-users and other visually-impaired people, some of whom had travelled from Scotland.

Goodall’s bid to force the council to think again over the road layout in the centre of Reading had received backing from disability organisations including Berkshire Disabled People Against Cuts (DPAC), Berkshire Guide Dogs for the Blind, Berkshire Vision, Reading Mencap, Reading Arthritis Matters and a representative of Age UK, who all combined to produce a leaflet detailing their concerns.

The court hearing was attended by Lord [Chris] Holmes, himself a blind retired Paralympian and now disability commissioner for the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

More here

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

Crabb scrapped IDS’s white paper because he ‘didn’t like the look of it’

From Disability News Service

The new work and pensions secretary scrapped the disability and employment white paper prepared by his predecessor Iain Duncan Smith because he “didn’t like the look” of it, a Tory MP has told a parliamentary meeting.

The new work and pensions secretary Stephen Crabb (pictured) had previously said that he wanted to “take a step back” from previous government plans to publish a white paper that would have included “firm legislative proposals” on supporting disabled people into work.

But fellow Conservative MP Heidi Allen told the all-party parliamentary disability group that there had been “a little bit of cynicism” about why Crabb had decided to postpone the white paper when he took over from Duncan Smith in March.

Some MPs and campaigners had criticised the decision, claiming that it was “kicking the issue into the long grass” and complaining that ministers had previously “bought off their own rebels” with a promise to have firm proposals in place through the white paper by the summer.

That promise had been made after Tory backbench unease about plans to cut almost £30 a week from payments to new claimants placed in the work-related activity group of employment and support allowance.

More here

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

Disability Rights UK seek new Trustees

From Disability Rights UK

Are you passionate about equal participation for all disabled people? Do you have the skills to be a Trustee?

Can you help strengthen the voice of disabled people and support Disability Rights UK to continue to build the organisation and achieve greater impact and sustainability?

Then come and join us. We are disabled people leading change, working for “Equal Participation for All”. We are seeking three Trustees to join our board. Our elections take place on 7th November, successful candidates will then join the board on 1st January 2017 for a three year term.

To assist with our board’s skill balance we would particularly welcome applications from people with expertise in income generation, financial management and communications.

Our board is currently under represented by women and by people from black and minority ethnic communities, so we would welcome applicants from those groups.

We are always keen to receive applications from disabled people with a wide range of impairment experiences including: learning difficulties, mental health conditions, neuro-diversity, being Deaf, hearing impairments, visual impairments, physical impairments, long term health conditions.

If you would like to apply, click here

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

InfoShare event – Wednesday 13th June

Are you a disabled person living in Manchester? Or do you know a disabled person living in Manchester? Come and find out what organisations in Manchester have to offer to disabled people.

Organisations who will be there include: Breakthrough UK, Greater Sport, People First, Anxiety UK, Transport for Greater Manchester, The Deaf Centre, The Volunteer Centre, Local Offer (Children and Family Services), Disabled Living, LGBT Foundation, African Caribbean Mental Health Services, Mind, Self Help Services, Albert Kennedy Trust and Genie Networks.

Info-Share will be in the large hall at the Deaf Centre, Crawford House, at the corner of Booth Street East and Oxford Road.

Wednesday 13th June 2016 – 10:30am – 2:30pm

Facebook event page here

for more info contact

Phone: 0161 636 7535
Email: lmarsh@gmcdp.com
Mobile for texts: 07508 537561

Greater Manchester Coalition of Disabled People
Website: www.gmcdp.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/gmcdp/
Twitter: @GMCDP

UK in breach of international human rights

From Centre for Welfare Rights:

The United Nations has confirmed that the UK’s Austerity policies breach the UK’s international human rights obligations.

The UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights has expressed “serious concern” about the impact of regressive policies on the enjoyment of economic and social rights in a damning reporton the UK.

Based on evidence it received from Just Fair and other civil society groups, the Committee concludes that austerity measures and social security reform breach the UK’s international human rights obligations.

This was the Committee’s first review of the UK since 2009 and thus its first verdict on the Austerity policies pursued by successive governments since the financial crash. Over eight months the Committee conducted a dialogue with government officials, the UK human rights commissions and civil society groups.

In a wide ranging assessment, expressed in unusually strong terms, the Committee sets out the following findings:

  • Tax policies, including VAT increases and reductions in inheritance and corporation tax, have diminished the UK’s ability “to address persistent social inequality and to collect sufficient resources to achieve the full realization of economic, social and cultural rights”. The Committee recommends the UK adopt a “socially equitable” tax policy and the adoption of strict measures to tackle tax abuse, in particular by corporations and high-net-worth individuals.
  • Austerity measures introduced since 2010 are having a disproportionate adverse impact on the most marginalised and disadvantaged citizens including women, children, persons with disabilities, low-income families and those with two or more children. The Committee recommends that the UK reverse the cuts in social security benefits and reviews the use of sanctions.
  • The new ‘National Living Wage’ is not sufficient to ensure a decent standard of living and should be extended to under-25s. The UK should also take steps to reduce use of “zero hour contracts”, which disproportionately affect women.
  • Despite rising employment levels the Committee is concerned about the high number of low-paid jobs, especially in sectors such as cleaning and homecare.
  • The Committee urges the UK to take immediate measures to reduce the exceptionally high levels of homelessness, particularly in England and Northern Ireland, and highlights the high cost and poor quality of homes in the private rented sector and the lack of sufficient social housing.
  • The UK is not doing enough to reduce reliance on food banks.

More here

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

Dean Trust U-Turn on plans to ‘bus out’ disabled pupils

The Dean Trust accused of discriminating against disabled pupils has made a U-turn. The Trust was blasted by parents over plans to bus disabled pupils from the ‘outstanding’ Ashton-on-Mersey School to a worse performing secondary six miles away in Partington.

A legal challenge was launched by parents against the trust in a bid to reverse the decision. The trust has now scrapped its plans after securing additional funding from the Trafford Council.

More here

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

 

How Does The Brexit Vote Affect The Rights Of Disabled People?

From DPAC:

Fiona McGhie, Public Law expert at Irwin Mitchell, said: “The common law and legislation in the UK have provided rights and protections for people with disabilities.

“In addition both the EU and the UK have ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) which guarantees equality of rights of disabled people before the law on issues such as health, education, employment, access to justice and independent living. The UK is also a signatory to the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) which prohibits discrimination on the grounds of disability (Article 14) and offers protection for people with disabilities through a number of the other articles. The Human Rights Act incorporates these rights into domestic legislation.

“The UK has developed a string of positive legislation for the protection of the rights of those with disabilities, most notably the Equality Act 2010. This Act consolidated a large amount of existing legislation (including those relating to other protected characteristics such as race, religion, gender and sexual orientation). This and previous legislation were introduced to ensure compliance with a number of EU equality directives.

“Membership of the EU offers a large degree of protection for people with disabilities because of its directives on equality. However, if that protection was removed by a vote to leave the EU, people with disabilities would still benefit from the CRPD and the ECHR. It is unlikely that Equality Act would be repealed should the UK leave the EU, as we would still need to comply with the other international conventions which we have ratified. However, people with disabilities would not benefit from any further directives or regulations that the EU issued on disability rights and would be reliant on domestic legislation and common law keeping pace with the advancement of the rights of people with disabilities.

“What Brexit would affect is the ability to potentially rely on the European Charter of Fundamental Rights (CFR) which in particular includes many wider social and economic rights, such as the rights to fair and just working conditions, to healthcare and to have personal data protected. If disabled people wished to try and strike down UK legislation as incompatible with rights under CFR under EU law – that avenue may not be available after the vote to leave.”

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

Commission launches new information on human rights

As part of their role to promote understanding of human rights, the Equality & Human Rights Commission has launched a new section on their website aimed at bringing human rights explaining how they work and the protections they offer. There is a very informative animation on the website explaining human rights in an aceessible way. More here

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

Imperial War Museum seeks your support

From Imperial War Museum:

Over at IWM North we’ve had some really exciting news. Our if:Volunteering for wellbeing programme has been shortlisted for the National Lottery Awards Best Health Project.

We’d really appreciate your support, as we have a fantastic opportunity to win. The project is clearly changing people’s lives and improving wellbeing, as you can see from the quotes below. It would be great if you could please share the text in red on your social media and internal comms pages/emails to get us off to a good start in the public vote.

Our friends at @IWMNorth & @McrMuseum have been nominated for a @LottoGoodCauses Award. Please vote for them here: http://www.lotterygoodcauses.org.uk/awards
About the project:if:Volunteering for Wellbeing is an exciting volunteer training and placement programme led by IWM North and Manchester Museum. The programme is supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund. The ten week training course uses the unique collections and spaces of IWM North, Manchester Museum or Museum of Science & Industry to develop communication, interpersonal, teamwork and customer service skills. Participants learn about their chosen Museum, volunteer roles and gain nationally recognised qualifications.
‘The programme has given me so much confidence, inspired my desire to learn and renewed my enthusiasm for life as a result.’ Volunteer 2014″Has the course changed my life? Yes and more. It has actually given me back my life, a life seemingly lost to lack of hope and depression”. Volunteer 2015

Read more here – www.volunteeringforwellbeing.org.uk

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

First figures on ESA mandatory reconsideration ‘show it is just a delaying tactic’

From Disability News Service

Official figures suggest that a new appeal stage introduced for unsuccessful claimants has been little more than a delaying tactic aimed at reducing the number of disabled people claiming benefits, say campaigners.

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has finally published statistics showing the impact of the process on claimants of the out-of-work disability benefit employment and support allowance (ESA).

Since October 2013, claimants of ESA and other benefits who want to dispute a decision made on their claim have had to ask DWP to reconsider the decision – a “mandatory reconsideration” (MR) – before they are allowed to lodge an appeal with the independent benefits tribunal system.

And now the first MR figures to be published by DWP show that only about 10 per cent of ESA claimants who appeal through the MR process are successful.

When MR was first introduced, DWP civil servants were overturning more than 40 per cent of ESA decisions.

But that figure has now fallen dramatically, and in the last year only 11 per cent of decisions have been “revised and allowed” – out of more than 10,000 MRs a month – with the proportion dropping even further in the first months of 2016.

For claimants who dispute being found fit for work, the success rate is even lower, although it is not possible to calculate from the figures published so far how it has changed since October 2013.

Campaigners and benefits experts have stressed that it is not possible to draw firm conclusions from the figures because it is not yet clear how many of those claimants turned down at the MR stage went on to be successful at a tribunal.

But they suggested that the figures show the MR stage is simply delaying the benefits process, and pushing disabled people already at risk of poverty into greater hardship.

More here

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

 

DPAC Manchester Manchester: National Day Of Action Against Sham PIP Assessments – Wed 13th July

From DPAC:

Atos, Maximus and Capita are literally making a killing from conducting sham assessments which are seeing thousands of legitimate claimants having their benefits refused, their incomes slashed and their motability cars removed. Whilst the success rate at tribunal is high, it is taking up to 6 months or longer for cases to be heard – leaving disabled people struggling unecessarily. Medical ‘professionals’ usually trained at public expense are deserting the NHS in order to conduct these murderous sham assessments in return for higher rates of pay. We say that all assessments should be carried out by the treatment teams in the community, and that rather than pouring taxpayer money into the poverty pimp industry, the state should be properly funding the NHS and benefits should meet the needs of all that are eligible. It is time to step up the struggle and to demand that the corporate assessors #DoNoHarm.This day of action has been called jointly by MHRN, Disabled People Against Cuts (DPAC) and WinVisible – women with visible & invisible disabilities

More here

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

Fifteen To One looking for contestants

TV’s iconic quiz show is back and they’re looking for you!

Fifteen To One, the classic quiz, is back for another series and looking for contestants.

Do you have what it takes to win the title of Fifteen To One ‘Grand Champion’ and a massive £40,000?

If so, apply to be a contestant now!

For an application email:
15to1apps@remedyproductions.tv

Are you up to the challenge?
Find us on Twitter: @15to1quiz

You can only apply once so please only send one completed application form. Successful applicants will be granted one audition only. All applicants must be 18 years or over and be legally resident in the UK. Terms and conditions apply.

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

Disabled man to sue NHS Trust over court order enforcing 3am removal from home

A disabled man says he plans to sue after a High Court judge gave medics permission to take him from home to hospital and authorised the use of force.

Aamir Mazhar, 25, who lives in Birmingham, says he aims to take legal action against health bosses who asked Mr Justice Mostyn to make the order – at an out-of-hours telephone hearing in the Family Division of the High Court.

He says the Birmingham Community Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust breached his human rights and deprived him of his liberty.

More here

(GMCDP does not necessarily support or promote any organisation, individual or website mentioned in this post.)

 

 

New Opinion piece by Rupy Kaur about the recent news about the Dean Trust and Ashton-on-Mersey school

GMCDP member Rupy Kaur has written a great blog piece on her thoughts on recent decisions from the Dean Trust and the Ashton-on-Mersey (more on the subject here)

“Ashton on Mersey were trail blazers. Now they are setting the clock back.As a disabled student Ashton on Mersey delivered a great education for me. Now they are set to put up barriers for the next generation of disabled students.”

 I was born in the late ‘80s, an era where disability was kept out of the norm, and a disabled child attending a mainstream school was taboo. I started my early years at a “special needs” nursery called Rodney House, followed by a “special needs” primary school, Lancasterian. The reasoning for this was that I was born with cerebral palsy, and that, because I was disabled, special needs schools were the only kind that would accept me.

 Don’t get me wrong, special school had its perks in that I would receive physiotherapy every day, and occasional hydrotherapy. But that was it. I was not pushed academically, and I was bored. We did get workbooks that I completed with enthusiasm, and in some respects I thought I was a mini Einstein as I was so quick to finish them.

 

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Opinion